More Flavorful Heart Healthy Recipes

Today it seems that most diets, including heart healthy diets are focused on reducing fat and calories. They are forgetting about sodium. Lowering sodium intake is also important, especially in regard to a heart healthy diet.

Of course, it is important to watch your fat intake as fat has calories. It is also important to watch for and lower bad fats like saturated and hydrogenated, and to eliminate trans fats. All fats are not created equal.

It is important to add good fats. Include more mono-unsaturated fats, such as olive oil, nuts, nut oils, and avocados. It is also important to include fish oils, especially from fish high in Omega 3’s like salmon. You may need to supplement with high-quality fish oils to make sure you get enough Omega 3 essential fatty acids.

Increase your intake of fresh vegetables and fruits. Include a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables. You may have heard it said, “Eat around the colors of the rainbow”. Most folks don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables on a daily basis, or enough variety. Many diets say to eat 4 to 6 servings a day. Experiment and try new foods, new tastes and new varieties of fruits and vegetables. Eat more variety and you’ll get more variety of nutrients.

Try adding one new (nutritious and heart-healthy) food a week. Perhaps you don’t eat dark leafy greens like spinach or not very often. Try a spinach salad (leave out the bacon), or a chicken breast stuffed with spinach, or add spinach to a pasta or soup recipe. Even when eating green salads try different types of greens. This helps you get used to new foods and tastes. This is good step as long as you don’t drown the salad in most salad dressings. Choose more heart healthy extra virgin olive oil-and-vinegar salad dressings and avoid the high sodium and saturated fat in most creamy and dairy based salad dressings.

Include fresh garlic. This not only adds a lot of flavor, but fresh garlic is very good for your heart: a win win situation. You can find a way to add fresh garlic to almost any dinner recipe or side dish. If you don’t like preparing fresh garlic you can use tools like a garlic press, garlic slicer, garlic peeler, even a small food processor, or an herb grinder, to help you out. Today you can also find jars of already-peeled, chopped or minced, fresh garlic in the grocery store. Learning to work with fresh garlic is worth it.

Choose no salt or salt free seasonings. This is probably one of the most important steps when cooking heart healthy recipes. You need to get the salt out and flavor in. Sometimes folks forget to use enough seasoning. They may be used to cooking with seasonings that had a lot of salt in them so they are more careful, almost too careful. When adding no salt seasonings, you can and should be generous. Increase the amount of seasoning and you increase flavor; just make sure it’s a flavor you like. Also, get a variety of no salt seasonings, as you can get tired pretty fast of eating the same flavor over and over.

For Long-term Weight Loss Fruits

People are so motivated when they start a weight-loss program. You can say, ‘I’m never going to eat another piece of pie,’ and you see the pounds coming off lead investigator. Eating fruits and vegetables may not make as big a difference in your caloric intake. But that small change can build up and give you a better long-term result, because it’s not as hard to do as giving up French fries forever.
Some new research tried to figure out what might help post-menopausal women achieve long-term weight loss. And it turns out that adding produce to their diet didn’t show up as particularly helpful in the short term, but in the long term it matter.
The researchers didn’t find that eating fire chicken was just fine as long as it came with a side of broccoli. What they found was that some behaviors are hard to maintain forever, and adding produce might be easier than avoiding all fried foods from the healthy diet for the long pull.
Some new research tried to figure out what might help post-menopausal women achieve long-term weight loss. And it turns out that adding produce to their diet didn’t show up as particularly helpful in the short term, but in the long term for the healthy lifestyle.
The study, published recently in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, looked at overweight post-menopausal women. Gibbs, an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh department of health and physical activity, said several factors work against long-term weight loss.
Not only does motivation decrease after you start losing weight, there are physiological changes, including a decreased resting metabolic rate. Appetite-related hormones increase. Researchers studying the brain are now finding that you have enhanced rewards and increased motivation to eat when you’ve lost weight, she says.
For older women, the additional decline in energy expenditure makes maintaining weight loss even tougher. Traditional behavioral treatments for obesity, focused on calories, have had poor long-term results.
A group of 508 women from the Pittsburgh area were divided into two, one group of which met regularly with nutritionists, exercise physiologists and psychologists to reduce fat and caloric intake, eat more produce and grains and exercise regularly.
The second group was offered some general health seminars.
The researchers looked at what happened after six months and after four years.
At four years, most of the intervention group had lost some weight, compared with about a third of the other group. Gibbs said that the women all had wanted to lose weight and sought help.
For the six-month mark, the researchers found that weight loss was associated with eating fewer desserts and fried foods, drinking fewer sugar-sweetened beverages, eating more fish and eating out less. At the four-year mark, some of those things still mattered. But eating more produce and less meat and cheese emerged as important predictors of long-term weight loss.

If the goal is to decrease the burden of obesity, the focus must be on long-term strategies because changes in eating behaviors only associated with short-term weight loss are likely ineffective and/or not sustainable, the researchers wrote.

Healthy Diet For Athletes

As the innovations of modern science continue to improve so does the diet of different athletes, in many cases the kinds of foods that you eat will determine if you excel at your sport or are destined for mediocrity. Regardless if you are professional or amateur athlete anything that you eat must meet certain requirements to be able to maintain peak levels of performance and to ensure continued improvement. To do this requires that all athletes have a healthy diet that will support their very active lifestyle. Below are some tips as well as tactics of a healthy diet for athletes.

Keep junk foods to a minimum: In general to be able to maintain peak levels of performance requires that you eat low fat foods that will give your body the vitamins and minerals that it needs. That being said, there is nothing wrong with enjoying the occasional fast food or other types of junk foods no more than once a week. This will help you to help you maintain a healthy balanced diet and still be able to enjoy a variety of different foods.

Make sure that you are taking in the proper amount of calories: A big problem that many athletes have is that they cut back drastically on the overall amount of a calories that they are consuming on a daily basis, only to wind up hurting their overall performance. In general what you want to do is make sure that you are eating at least 1,200 to 1,500 calories a day. If you are even more active you may want to maintain levels of at least 2,000 to 3,000 calories per day. This well helps ensure that you are eating the right amount of nutrients to maintain peak performance levels.

Eat a wide variety of foods: Its no secret that the body requires a wide variety of nutrients and minerals for you to be able to maintain current levels of fitness. What you want to do is eat many different types of foods that will help build muscle and reduce fat including: beans, pasta, lean meats, vegetables, fruits, fish, grains and dairy. If for some reason you are unwilling to eat all of these different groups another option is to take a multi vitamin that will be able to give you all the nutrition from these different groups.

Keep a variety in your diet: In many cases an athlete will eat the same food over and over again. This lack of variety fails to give your body the true amount of nutrients that it needs and the chances of you maintaining a healthy diet to keep up with peak performance drops over time since it is more than likely that you will become bored with what you eat, eventually turning to those foods that are not healthy for you.

Clearly a Healthy diet for Athletes has a critical factor in determining your success. Some tips and tactics that will help you maintain a healthy diet include: keeping junk foods to a minimum, taking the proper amounts of nutrients, eating a wide variety of foods and keeping variety in your diet. By doing this you will be able to maintain peak levels of health leading to improved athletic.